The Global State of Citizenship: What’s New in the GLOBALCIT Citizenship Law Dataset, Version 2.0?

This is the third in a series of blog posts on The Global State of Citizenship, accompanying the launch of an updated version of the GLOBALCIT Citizenship Law Dataset. The first blog post on discrimination in citizenship law was published on May 1. The second blog post on security-based citizenship deprivation was published on May 12. This blog post highlights what is new in the updated version of the Dataset compared to its predecessor.

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The Global State of Citizenship: Discrimination in nationality laws increasingly exceptional on the surface, but pervasive behind the scenes

This is the first post in a series of blog posts on The Global State of Citizenship, accompanying the launch of an updated version of the GLOBALCIT Citizenship Law Dataset. The v2 version of the Dataset will include data on all modes of acquisition and loss of citizenship in 191 countries, covering the years 2020-2022; as well a longitudinal data on dual citizenship acceptance worldwide, 1960-2022.

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Citizenship deprivation as banishment: The High Court of Australia in Alexander’s case

On 8 June 2022, in Alexander v Minister for Home Affairs [2022] HCA 19, the High Court of Australia invalidated a ministerial power of citizenship deprivation. It reasoned that the deprivation was punishment for misconduct. Punishment for misconduct is an exclusively judicial function, one that cannot be conferred on the executive. This characterization of deprivation as punishment rested on a view of citizenship as a fundamental assurance of territorial security.

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Citizenship deprivation in a context of terrorist violence: (multiple) membership and citizenship in France and the Maghreb

This blog post presents some reflections on the evolution of legal frameworks and political debates relating to citizenship deprivation in France and the Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia). It explores two key stumbling blocks – the restriction of citizenship deprivation to those who hold another citizenship and to citizens by ‘acquisition’ – which are widely shared across the world. The blog concludes by exploring what it terms the new ‘identity turn’ in questions of deprivation.

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